How to fill in lawn bowls scorecard | a helpful illustrated guide

We cover how to fill in a lawn bowls scorecard. This is a helpful illustrated guide for anyone unsure on how to do it

How to fill in lawn bowls scorecard | a helpful illustrated guide

What does a scorecard look like?

The sections of a scorecard

The scorecard is kept as a record of each game - therefore it will contain everything you’ll want to know about where, when, and how the game was played. The scorecard is split up into several sections, each focusing on one of those three elements.

The Game

The top section normally consists of the game being played. From our example, we would need to add in the competition, the date, who was playing (home team going first), and what number rink they are playing on.

The Teams

Next comes the teams. Each member of the team is listed in position order. If you are playing triples, you would only fill in “1”, “2”, and “SKIP” as no “3” is playing.

The Score

Each row represents a single end. After each end, you write the shots scored for the winning team in the SHOTS column and a dash (“-”) for the losing team’s SHOTS column. You write and the cumulative score for each team in the TOTALS column.

A single scorecard will have space for anywhere up to 40 ends. If your game lasts longer you can always carry on on a second scorecard

The Result

Once the game is completed, either from total ends or total shots, the final score is written in the bottom section.

An example of a completed scorecard

Here we will show a hypothetical game, and we will show what to write for each section.

Our example will be for the following game:

A short triples game over 7 ends, between “Team A” and “Team B”. The game is played for “The Triples Cup”. The game is being played on the 1st September 2020 and it was decided to play on rink 3.

Before the game

We need to fill in the details of the game, and the teams. Here we show the inputs for our example.

End 1

Team A scores 2. So we put “2” in the left SHOTS column and “-” in the right SHOTS column.

The score is 2-0 so we add that into the TOTALS columns.

End 2

Team A scores 2. So we put “2” in the left SHOTS column and “-” in the right SHOTS column.

The score is 4-0 so we add that into the TOTALS columns.

End 3

Team A scores 1. So we put “1” in the left SHOTS column and “-” in the right SHOTS column.

The score is 5-0 so we add that into the TOTALS columns.

End 4

Team B scores 2. So we put “-” in the left SHOTS column and “2” in the right SHOTS column.

The score is 5-2 so we add that into the TOTALS columns.

End 5

Team A scores 2. So we put “2” in the left SHOTS column and “-” in the right SHOTS column.

The score is 7-2 so we add that into the TOTALS columns.

End 6

Team B scores 4. So we put “-” in the left SHOTS column and “4” in the right SHOTS column.

The score is 7-6 so we add that into the TOTALS columns.

End 7

Team A scores 1. So we put “1” in the left SHOTS column and “-” in the right SHOTS column.

The score is 8-6 so we add that into the TOTALS columns.

The result

Team A wins by 8 shots to 6. So we put the final score in the bottom section, and we’re done!

Some scorecards require the Skips to sign it, however, this will depend on the rules of the competition being played.

As you can see the scorecard is pretty straight forward once you’ve got the hang of it! And as always, don’t be afraid to ask if you ever get stuck, there will always be someone experienced around to help.

JACK HIGH BOWLS